The far side... of the Moon

The Museum of the Moon exhibit of a six-metre Moon at the Natural History Museum in London is both familiar and jarring.
Published in Astronomy
The far side... of the Moon
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Wow. Last night I was at the opening of the Museum of the Moon exhibit at the Natural History Museum in London. It wasn't so much that I was seeing the Moon in a different light (the lighting inside the gallery was really natural, by the way) but I found it slightly disturbing on that scale -- almost supernatural. NASA's images are truly mind-blowing.

It turns out that the artist, Luke Jerram, had wanted to make such a large-scale Moon for twenty years, but the technology has only just caught up with his vision. His upbringing in Bristol, where the Severn rises and falls by up to 15 m, brought an awareness of our deep relationship with the Moon. He has been touring the world with his model of the Moon, from churches to museums. See it now, for free, at the Natural History Museum (until 1 January 2020): https://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/exhibitions/museum-of-the-moon.html

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Astronomy, Cosmology and Space Sciences
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