Call for papers: Management opportunities at the wildlife-livestock interface

The convergence of wildlife and livestock has become increasingly prevalent due to global change and various human-induced factors, such as shifts in animal production systems.
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The wildlife-livestock interface forms a dynamic entity where each component (livestock, wildlife, and the environment) assumes distinct roles. These components are intricately linked through ecological and evolutionary processes. The coexistence of livestock and wildlife has both positive and negative repercussions, impacting habitat quality, biodiversity, disease dynamics, and the status of large predators, and scavengers, among others. This interface gives rise to numerous conflicts and opportunities, involving multiple stakeholders whose interests must be carefully considered when devising interventions.

A recent book authored by Vicente, VerCauteren & Gortázar has reviewed the wildlife-livestock interface, with a particular focus on shared infections. The authors emphasized the urgent need to prioritize the inclusion of these animal interfaces in research endeavors. By doing so, we can identify and address knowledge gaps, providing valuable insights to inform decision-makers and policymakers on matters related to food security, biodiversity conservation, and the management of shared pathogens.

This Topical Collection seeks to encourage the submission of reviews, research studies, and commentaries that explore the wildlife-livestock interface. The objective is to determine how we can optimize the positive aspects of animal production while minimizing potential adverse effects. We welcome contributions from all corners of the globe, as this diversity will offer a more comprehensive perspective on the conflicts, opportunities, and intervention strategies within various environments and ecosystems.

If you wish to contribute to this exciting series of articles, please indicate that your manuscript is intended for the Topical Collection "Management Opportunities at the Wildlife-Livestock Interface" when submitting it through our submission platform.

The Topical Collection is edited by Patricia Barroso Seano (University of Leon, Spain); Kurt VerCauteren (National Wildlife Research Center, USA) and Joaquín Vicente Baños (University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain).

Submission deadline: 31 October 2024.

Please contact the Guest Editors or the Editorial Office for more information.

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Animal Agriculture
Life Sciences > Biological Sciences > Zoology > Animal Science > Animal Agriculture
Animal Science
Life Sciences > Biological Sciences > Zoology > Animal Science
Fish and Wildlife Biology
Life Sciences > Biological Sciences > Zoology > Animal Science > Fish and Wildlife Biology
Agroecology
Humanities and Social Sciences > Society > Anthropology > Environmental Anthropology > Agroecology
Ecology
Life Sciences > Biological Sciences > Ecology
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Life Sciences > Biological Sciences > Zoology

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Management opportunities at the wildlife-livestock interface

Periodically, the European Journal of Wildlife Research features a series of interconnected articles addressing current and relevant topics. We are delighted to announce the launch of a new Topical Collection centered around "Management Opportunities at the Wildlife-Livestock Interface."

The convergence of wildlife and livestock has become increasingly prevalent due to global change and various human-induced factors, such as shifts in animal production systems. This wildlife-livestock interface forms a dynamic entity where each component (livestock, wildlife, and the environment) assumes distinct roles. These components are intricately linked through ecological and evolutionary processes. The coexistence of livestock and wildlife has both positive and negative repercussions, impacting habitat quality, biodiversity, disease dynamics, and the status of large predators, and scavengers, among others. This interface gives rise to numerous conflicts and opportunities, involving multiple stakeholders whose interests must be carefully considered when devising interventions.

A recent book authored by Vicente, VerCauteren & Gortázar has reviewed the wildlife-livestock interface, with a particular focus on shared infections. The authors emphasized the urgent need to prioritize the inclusion of these animal interfaces in research endeavors. By doing so, we can identify and address knowledge gaps, providing valuable insights to inform decision-makers and policymakers on matters related to food security, biodiversity conservation, and the management of shared pathogens.

Our new Topical Collection seeks to encourage the submission of reviews, research studies, and commentaries that explore the wildlife-livestock interface. The objective is to determine how we can optimize the positive aspects of animal production while minimizing potential adverse effects. We welcome contributions from all corners of the globe, as this diversity will offer a more comprehensive perspective on the conflicts, opportunities, and intervention strategies within various environments and ecosystems.

If you wish to contribute to this exciting series of articles, please indicate that your manuscript is intended for the Topical Collection "Management Opportunities at the Wildlife-Livestock Interface" when submitting it through our submission platform.

Thank you for your interest and participation in advancing our understanding of this crucial and complex subject.

Publishing Model: Hybrid

Deadline: Oct 31, 2024

Management of Alien Game Species

Over the years, whether as the result of deliberate introduction or natural colonisation, a significant number of non-native species of animals and plants have become established within Europe and elsewhere. EU Regulation 1143/2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species has at its core a List of Invasive Alien Species of Union Concern, which currently includes 66 species (30 animals and 36 plants) - and this problem with invasive exotics and their impacts on native species of fauna and flora is mirrored all over the world. As knowledge increases of their ecology (and potential ways of managing populations and their impacts), it would seem very timely to offer some consideration to this as a special theme within EJWR.

This new Topical Collection will be aimed at highlighting research studies of the ecology, ecological impact, and options for effective management for invasive game species in general: birds, mammals or other wildlife, introduced outside their native range as game animals and now having negative impacts on native ecosystems, agriculture, or health. The editors are interested in articles from all continents, provided the species was originally introduced for hunting purposes or has a clear impact on game species ecology and management.

If you are interested in submitting a contribution to this new series of articles, please mark your article, when submitting your manuscript here, as a contribution to the Collection “Management of alien game species”.

Publishing Model: Hybrid

Deadline: Ongoing