India’s biogeochemical capacity to attain food security and remediate climate

Enhanced weathering aim to remove CO2 from the atmosphere by accelerating the reaction of this greenhouse gas with alkaline minerals. This suite of geochemical negative emissions technologies has the potential to achieve CO2 removal rates of >1 GT per year, yet will require GT of suitable rock.
Published in Earth & Environment
India’s biogeochemical capacity to attain food security and remediate climate
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India’s biogeochemical capacity to attain food security and remediate climate - Environmental Geochemistry and Health

In order to supply wholesome food and slow down climate change, this paper covers India’s agrogeological resources. The soils are the result of the weathering of rocks with ages ranging from more than a billion years to the most recent Holocene. Because they are severely deficient in vital minerals, many soils have low agricultural production. In addition to helping to fertilise soils, reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and stop the acidification of the Indian Ocean, rock powder weathering and biochar have significant positive effects on the productivity of Indian soils. The nutrient density of food is also increased which improves health and lowers the demand for and cost of medical treatment. Remineralization may help to solve Indian soil issues including soil infertility and texture. To improve soil and plant nutrition, dusts of carbonate, basic, and ultrabasic rocks are readily available at mining sites in India combined with biochar. Adding different grain sizes to the soil helps improve the texture of the soil. Silicate and carbonate rock powders enhance soil structure by promoting the creation of soil organic matter and fostering the growth of advantageous microbial communities. These processes offer a low-cost method of remineralizing soils with important macro- and micronutrients. For each significant soil/crop/climate system, an optimised application of India’s rock powder resources must be determined through a national research and development programme. India’s capacity to adapt to the mounting challenges of population expansion and climate change would be significantly improved by the findings of this study programme. Graphical abstract

This study examines India's agrogeological resources in order to offer nutritious food while also mitigating climate change. Because of a lack of key minerals, many soils have low agricultural yields. Rock powder weathering benefits Indian soil productivity by helping to fertilise soils, lower atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and halt acidification of the Indian Ocean. The nutrient density of food is also increased, which improves health while minimising the demand for and cost of medical treatment. Basic and ultrabasic rock dusts combined with biochar are extensively accessible at Indian mining sites to improve soil and plant nutrition. 

In order to supply wholesome food and slow down climate change, this paper covers India’s agrogeological resources. The soils are the result of the weathering of rocks with ages ranging from more than a billion years to the most recent Holocene. Because they are severely deficient in vital minerals,  many soils have low agricultural production. In addition to helping to fertilise soils, reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and stop the acidification of the Indian Ocean, rock powder weathering and biochar have significant positive effects on the productivity of Indian soils. The nutrient density of food is also increased which improves health and lowers the demand for and cost of medical treatment. Remineralization may help to solve Indian soil issues including soil infertility and texture. To improve soil and plant nutrition, dusts of carbonate, basic, and ultrabasic rocks are readily available at mining sites in India combined with biochar. Adding different grain sizes to the soil helps improve the texture of the soil. Silicate and carbonate rock powders enhance soil structure by promoting the creation of soil organic matter and fostering the growth of advantageous microbial communities. These processes offer a low-cost method of remineralizing soils with important macro- and micronutrients. For each  significant soil/crop/climate system, an optimized application of India’s rock powder resources must be determined through a national research and development programme. India’s capacity to adapt to the mounting challenges of population expansion and climate change would be significantly improved by the findings of this study programme.

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Biogeosciences
Physical Sciences > Earth and Environmental Sciences > Earth Sciences > Biogeosciences

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